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CASE REPORT
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 247-249

Recurrent sternal sinuses caused by retained temporary epicardial pacing wires and different wire fixation techniques


1 Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesia, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anish Gupta
Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, 98, Om Vihar, Phase-1A, Shiv Shankar Road, Uttam Nagar, New Delhi - 110 059
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_35_18

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Temporary epicardial pacing wires are routinely used after open-heart surgery without any major complications, but varied complications have been described with their use though rare. They are often pulled out after recovery of the patient, usually on the 4th postoperative day, but sometimes, they are cut flush with the skin, especially if they are not coming out after the usual amount of pulling force. We describe a patient who had recurrent sternal sinuses with retained pacing wires which were missed on imaging. We emphasize on the importance of proper fixing of epicardial pacing wires during cardiac surgery, the need for their complete removal after recovery and the need of documenting the same in discharge summaries if they are cut flush and retained in situ.


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