• Users Online: 793
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login
Export selected to
Endnote
Reference Manager
Procite
Medlars Format
RefWorks Format
BibTex Format
   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
May-August 2017
Volume 3 | Issue 2
Page Nos. 67-129

Online since Monday, November 20, 2017

Accessed 1,100 times.

PDF access policy
Journal allows immediate open access to content in HTML + PDF
View as eBookView issue as eBook
Author Institution MappingAuthor Institution Mapping
Access StatisticsIssue statistics
RSS FeedRSS
Hide all abstracts  Show selected abstracts  Export selected to  Add to my list
EDITORIAL  

The road less travelled p. 67
Sandeep Seth, Shyamal K Goswami
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_47_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
HONEY BEE SECTION Top

Nobel prize for the fruit fly p. 68
Soumi Das
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_42_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
HONEY BEE SECTION - INNOVATIONS FOR THE HEART Top

Novel electro-acoustic technology for the screening and management of heart failure p. 70
A Vijayasimha
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_41_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
REVIEW ARTICLES Top

Cardiac stem cell therapy: Current status p. 74
Sridharan Umapathy
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_12_17  
Cardiac injury due to any cause leads to cardiac cell damage and thereby to ventricular dysfunction. Unlike current medical therapy, cardiac regeneration by stem cell therapy is a promising approach which has a potential to reverse left ventricular dysfunction. It is conceived to complement and potentially transform available therapeutic armamentarium. Early experience in clinical studies support the safety and feasibility of cell therapy and as adjuvants to established practice. This review discusses type of stem cells used, its therapeutic indications, and its current status.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Cardiology update 2017: The second quarter p. 79
Sunil Kumar Verma, S Umapathy
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_38_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Cancer therapy-induced cardiotoxicity: Review and algorithmic approach toward evaluation p. 82
K Purkayastha, Rachna Seth, Sandeep Seth, Alex R Lyon
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_33_17  
In pediatric cancer, the overall 5-year survival has increased to more than 80%, but these improvements in cancer outcomes have come at the cost of increased morbidity and mortality. These can occur during or early after treatment, and in others may occur many years after cancer treatment is completed. Survivors of childhood cancers are at an increased risk of developing congestive heart failure and premature death due to cardiac causes (coronary artery disease, stroke, and congestive heart failure). There is a strong dose-dependent relationship between anthracycline chemotherapy exposure and risk of congestive heart failure, and the risk is increased in those who have been exposed to chest radiation. Early detection of myocardial injury, prevention of myocardial dysfunction, strategies to promote quick recovery of myocardial function in case of injury, and monitoring for delayed effects of cancer therapy are areas which both oncologists as well as cardiologists looking after cancer patients need to understand. A subspecialty of cardio-oncology has emerged to allow more focus in these areas.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
ORIGINAL ARTICLES Top

Heart transplant in India: Lessons learned p. 94
Balram Airan, Sarvesh Pal Singh, Sandeep Seth, Milind Padmakar Hote, Manoj Kumar Sahu, Palleti Rajashekar, Velayoudham Devagourou, Sambhunath Das, Neeraj Parakh, Ruma Ray, Sudheer Arava
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_25_17  
Introduction: Heart Transplant in India started in 1994. We were initially doing 1-2 per year but the numbers have picked up since 2014 and we have done 25 in the past 3 years. We describe our experience of the last 4 years in this paper. Results: Initially, we experienced a relatively higher rate of rejections, fungal infections and graft failure. As we changed protocols, stopped using induction therapy except in high risk, maintained higher levels of immune suppression and tapered steroids faster in the first year, the complications reduced. All patients who had rejections and all the later transplants were maintained on a regime of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroids along with six months of valgancyclovir, voriconazole and co-trimoxazole. Steroids were tapered by six months to 0.1 mg/kg per day in all patients. Conclusions: In our recent patients, infection was the most common adverse event followed by rejection and PGD. In the latter half of our experience, we found that the complications reduced, suggesting that experience leads to less complications.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Epidemiologic surveillance on quality of life in patients with systolic heart failure after treatment with the selective heart rate inhibitor ivabradine p. 100
M Srinivasa Rao, Sankar Chandra Mandal
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_8_17  
Background: Patients with systolic heart failure (HF) frequently have symptoms despite receiving standard treatment. The addition of the selective heart rate inhibitor ivabradine has been shown to improve their quality of life (QOL) in randomized trials but not under day-to-day practice conditions. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess changes in QOL after the addition of ivabradine to the standard treatment of patients with systolic HF, in daily clinical practice. Patients and Methods: In a multicenter surveillance protocol, patients with a diagnosis of systolic HF who were prospectively prescribed ivabradine 5–7.5 mg twice a day for 60 days were selected for surveillance on their QOL. Primary data on demographic and clinical characteristics, together with a change in QOL assessed by a visual analog scale, during a 60-day follow-up, were extracted for analysis from the case records of patients kept with the investigators. Results: In 594 patients with systolic HF who received ivabradine in addition to standard treatment for 60 days, intention to treat analysts showed that 465 (78.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 74.7–81.4) had improvement in QOL. The mean (95% CI) QOL score increased by 37.0% (35.1–39.1). Conclusion: These results confirm the observations of previous randomized trials that in day-to-day clinical practice, patients with systolic HF benefit from an improvement in QOL when ivabradine is added to their standard treatment.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CURRICULUM IN CARDIOLOGY - JOURNAL CLUB Top

The Angiotensin II for the treatment of high-output Shock-3 Trial (Athos-3) p. 103
Nirmal Ghati
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_29_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CURRICULUM IN CARDIOLOGY - STATISTICAL PAGES Top

Number needed to treat p. 106
Amitabh Biswas
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_31_17  
The Number Needed To Treat (NNT) is a measure used in epidemiology to convey the effectiveness of an intervention. It is the average number of patients who need to be treated to prevent one bad outcome. It is the reverse of the Absolute Risk Reduction. The lower the NNT, the more effective the intervention. In this article we discuss the concept and limitations of this measure.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CURRICULUM IN CARDIOLOGY - CASE DISCUSSION Top

Ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm: Clinical case presentation and management p. 109
Nitin Kumar Parashar, Dinkar Bhasin, Patil Surajkumar Marotrao, Faraz Ahmed Farooqui, Sunil Kumar Verma, Anita Saxena
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_27_17  
A 27-year-old female presented with generalized body swelling and progressive shortness of breath for the past 4 months. On examination, she had a loud continuous murmur, elevated jugular venous pressure, and gross ascites. The examination findings, electrocardiogram, chest radiography, and echocardiogram are discussed in a step-wise manner to arrive at a diagnosis and plan of management of a patient with ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is discussed along with review of relevant literature.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CURRICULUM IN CARDIOLOGY - HISTORY OF MEDICINE Top

“Vulnerato corde homo vivere non potest” (“Man can not live with a wounded heart”) p. 115
V Devagourou
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_40_17  
The first ever successful cardiac surgery was a repair of a stab wound of the right ventricle by Dr Ludwig Rehn from Frankfurt, Germany on 7th September 1896. It required Dwight Harken to successfully operate on bomb victims of world war II and to save more than 100 soldiers to open the heart to surgical techniques. He operated on 130 soldiers without a single fatality. This article recalls these two moments of cardiac surgery.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CURRICULUM IN CARDIOLOGY - IMAGES Top

Pectus carinatum (Pigeon Chest) p. 118
Madhav Bhargava, Raghav Bhargava
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_37_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CURRICULUM IN CARDIOLOGY - BOOK REVIEW Top

Being mortal: Medicine and what matters in the end p. 120
Udbhav Seth
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_34_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CASE REPORT Top

Eight months of HeartMate II device support without drug therapy p. 122
Kewal Krishan, Sean Pinney, Anelechi C Anyanwu
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_30_17  
Thromboembolic complication rates of 20%–30% were initially a major limitation to the widespread use of left ventricular assist devices. The success of the HeartMate (Thoratec, Corp., Pleasanton, CA, USA) device has been partly due to the reduced incidence of thromboembolic events, although anticoagulation regime has been recommended for this mechanical circulatory support. We here present a case with the placement of HeartMate II in a patient, noncompliant to medical therapy where device worked for 8 months without any anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
LETTERS TO EDITOR Top

DM cardiac surgical intensive care: A new course on the horizon p. 125
Sarvesh Pal Singh
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_43_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

An update on mid-term international society of heart research – Indian section meeting: Cardiovascular research convergence 2017 p. 127
Sanjay K Banerjee, Sandeep Seth
DOI:10.4103/jpcs.jpcs_44_17  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Subscribe this journal
Submit articles
Most popular articles
Joiu us as a reviewer
Email alerts
Recommend this journal